‘Mental scars’ haunt England: Waugh

n selector Mark Waugh says England will have to overcome “mental scars” and “a lot of negative thoughts” to force their way back into the Ashes series, quipping that their tailenders will be having nightmares for two months after being bounced in Brisbane.
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intend to make no changes to a winning bowling attack for the day-night Test in Adelaide so long as Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood pull up unscathed from the Gabba, resisting the temptation to rest one under lights and draft pink-ball specialist Chadd Sayers into the XI on his home track.

That spells bad news for the England middle order and tail, who were left ducking, weaving and fending for their own protection by a couple of intense short-bowling bursts by Cummins and Starc during the first Test.

England captain Joe Root required a replacement helmet and a concussion assessment after being struck in the grille of his lid by one hostile Starc delivery late on the third day at the Gabba, but it was to the lower order that ‘s fastest two bowlers found the short stuff most effective.

Wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow and seamers Chris Woakes and Jake Ball all fell foul of bumpers in Brisbane as England folded without great resistance in their second innings, with 1.97-metre Ball having so few answers that he could only smile, nervously, when in the thick of it and concentrate on getting out of the way. Others in the tail such as Stuart Broad were also given a torrid time.

“The first probably two-and-a-half days the pitch was really slow, so the short stuff just wasn’t going to work,” Waugh told the Big Sports Breakfast on Tuesday.

“We saw Mitchell Starc bowl nice and full on the first morning and, as the pitch hardened up that intimidation factor came in, in the second innings.

“There was a lot of short-pitched bowling. I reckon the three tailenders, they’re going to be having nightmares for two months waiting to go in to bat.

“Jake Ball copped an absolute pounding, as did Broad. [James] Anderson wasn’t there that long but it’s going to be a tough summer for the batsmen if the standard is that good.”

have made it clear they are not about to switch tactics after taking a 1-0 lead. Test captain Steve Smith declared after the win in Brisbane that the England tail could “expect a bit more of a barrage, I’d say” and that forecast was confirmed by coach Darren Lehmann as the n team flew to Adelaide on Tuesday.

“That’s the blueprint,” Lehmann said. “It’s no secret we’re going to attack their middle and lower order like that. Hopefully that success continues.”

“That certainly hasn’t changed from four years ago. It’s a bit different in than England where grounds are smaller and you can’t really get away with it. On bigger grounds you can. So that’s one for us that we see as an advantage. They did it quite a lot to us as well. It’s a ploy a lot of people do now.”

Waugh, who with Lehmann sits on the four-man Test selection panel, concedes that England will be better placed in day-night conditions in the second Test, which starts on Saturday, but believes the tourists will have psychological hurdles to clear after slumping to a 10-wicket defeat on the fifth morning of what was for the first three days a closely fought and engrossing contest in Brisbane.

“They were in the game, so they’ve got some positives to take out of it,” Waugh said. “But I still think there is going to a be a lot of negative thoughts going through their team heading into Adelaide on a pitch where it should even things up a bit. We know [in] day-night cricket, if you’re batting at the wrong time, it can be difficult.

“They should fight back but I think they’ve got a lot of mental scars to come out of that first Test.”

n selector Mark Waugh says England will have to overcome “mental scars” and “a lot of negative thoughts” to force their way back into the Ashes series, quipping that their tailenders will be having nightmares for two months after being bounced in Brisbane.
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intend to make no changes to a winning bowling attack for the day-night Test in Adelaide so long as Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood pull up unscathed from the Gabba, resisting the temptation to rest one under lights and draft pink-ball specialist Chadd Sayers into the XI on his home track.

That spells bad news for the England middle order and tail, who were left ducking, weaving and fending for their own protection by a couple of intense short-bowling bursts by Cummins and Starc during the first Test.

England captain Joe Root required a replacement helmet and a concussion assessment after being struck in the grille of his lid by one hostile Starc delivery late on the third day at the Gabba, but it was to the lower order that ‘s fastest two bowlers found the short stuff most effective.

Wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow and seamers Chris Woakes and Jake Ball all fell foul of bumpers in Brisbane as England folded without great resistance in their second innings, with 1.97-metre Ball having so few answers that he could only smile, nervously, when in the thick of it and concentrate on getting out of the way. Others in the tail such as Stuart Broad were also given a torrid time.

“The first probably two-and-a-half days the pitch was really slow, so the short stuff just wasn’t going to work,” Waugh told the Big Sports Breakfast on Tuesday.

“We saw Mitchell Starc bowl nice and full on the first morning and, as the pitch hardened up that intimidation factor came in, in the second innings.

“There was a lot of short-pitched bowling. I reckon the three tailenders, they’re going to be having nightmares for two months waiting to go in to bat.

“Jake Ball copped an absolute pounding, as did Broad. [James] Anderson wasn’t there that long but it’s going to be a tough summer for the batsmen if the standard is that good.”

have made it clear they are not about to switch tactics after taking a 1-0 lead. Test captain Steve Smith declared after the win in Brisbane that the England tail could “expect a bit more of a barrage, I’d say” and that forecast was confirmed by coach Darren Lehmann as the n team flew to Adelaide on Tuesday.

“That’s the blueprint,” Lehmann said. “It’s no secret we’re going to attack their middle and lower order like that. Hopefully that success continues.”

“That certainly hasn’t changed from four years ago. It’s a bit different in than England where grounds are smaller and you can’t really get away with it. On bigger grounds you can. So that’s one for us that we see as an advantage. They did it quite a lot to us as well. It’s a ploy a lot of people do now.”

Waugh, who with Lehmann sits on the four-man Test selection panel, concedes that England will be better placed in day-night conditions in the second Test, which starts on Saturday, but believes the tourists will have psychological hurdles to clear after slumping to a 10-wicket defeat on the fifth morning of what was for the first three days a closely fought and engrossing contest in Brisbane.

“They were in the game, so they’ve got some positives to take out of it,” Waugh said. “But I still think there is going to a be a lot of negative thoughts going through their team heading into Adelaide on a pitch where it should even things up a bit. We know [in] day-night cricket, if you’re batting at the wrong time, it can be difficult.

“They should fight back but I think they’ve got a lot of mental scars to come out of that first Test.”