China to Bali flights cancelled as Mount Agung erupts

Tourists in Bali stop to view Mount Agung, totally swallowed by the grey ash plumes and clouds. Photo: Amilia RosaThousands of holidaymakers stranded in Bali are set to spend another day in Indonesia as volcanic ash spews into the air surrounding the island’s airport.
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All flights from to Bali were cancelled on Monday because of the ash cloud around Mount Agung.

Indonesian authorities closed Ngurah Rai International Airport in Denpasar on Monday and ordered people within 10 kilometres of the erupting volcano to evacuate after raising the alert to level 4 – the highest level.

The airport said in a statement that 445 flights – 196 international and 249 domestic – and 59,000 passengers had been affected.

Eruptions from Mount Agung have sent volcanic ash and steam up to 4000 metres into the skies above the summit.

“Continuing plumes of smoke are occasionally accompanied by explosive eruptions and the sound of weak blasts that can be heard up to 12 kilometres from the peak,” the Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) said in a statement.

“Rays of fire are increasingly visible from night to the following day. This indicates the potential for a larger eruption is imminent,” it said.

Jetstar, Virgin and Qantas advised passengers between 10am and 11am on Monday that all flights were cancelled.

The decision was made on safety grounds and overturns earlier expectations that flights would go ahead.

“While these disruptions are frustrating, we will always put safety before schedule,” Jetstar said in a statement.

Crowds of passengers cram customer service desks set up at Denpasar airport’s international terminal on Monday. Photo: Amilia Rosa

Virgin updated its announcement online saying Denpasar Airport had closed and the airline had subsequently cancelled all flights to Bali.

Eruptions and ash falls are likely to continue for at least the next 24 hours, the n Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) said on Monday.

And it has –enough to keep the airport closed again on Tuesday and through to 7am on Wednesday.

The BoM’s Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), which is based in Darwin, said the height of the eruption has been steadily increasing and that it is continuing to advise the aviation industry about the potential impact of volcanic ash.

“The height of the eruption has been steadily increasing, ash is currently observed to a height of 30,000 feet (or 9144 metres) and a small amount of ash has fallen at Denpasar Airport and acrossBali’s south east,” it said in a statement.

Airport spokesman Arie Ahsan said the airport closure was based on information fromVAACand the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatologyand Geophysics.

We’re continuing to closely monitor Mount Agung in Bali. Due to increased volcanic ash and current weather conditions, Denpasar Airport is now closed and we have cancelled today’s flights. More info here: https://t苏州夜场招聘/LD8rC5LZdZ

— Virgin (@Virgin) November 26, 2017Waspadai banjir lahar hujan (lahar dingin) di sekitar Gunung Agung. Banjir lahar hujan sudah terjadi di beberapa tempat di lereng Gunung Agung. Hujan akan meningkat. Jangan melakukan aktivitas di sekitar sungai. Radius 8-10 km harus kosong dari aktivitas masyarakat. #Balipic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/5vuZ4KTTYa

— Sutopo Purwo Nugroho (@Sutopo_BNPB) November 27, 2017

Volcanic ash poses a potentially deadly threat to aircraft and passengers.

Mount Agung is just over 72 kilometres from Kuta, and towers over eastern Bali at a height of just over 3000 metres.

It last erupted in 1963, killing more than 1000 people and razing several villages.

with AAP

Tourists in Bali stop to view Mount Agung, totally swallowed by the grey ash plumes and clouds. Photo: Amilia RosaThousands of holidaymakers stranded in Bali are set to spend another day in Indonesia as volcanic ash spews into the air surrounding the island’s airport.
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All flights from to Bali were cancelled on Monday because of the ash cloud around Mount Agung.

Indonesian authorities closed Ngurah Rai International Airport in Denpasar on Monday and ordered people within 10 kilometres of the erupting volcano to evacuate after raising the alert to level 4 – the highest level.

The airport said in a statement that 445 flights – 196 international and 249 domestic – and 59,000 passengers had been affected.

Eruptions from Mount Agung have sent volcanic ash and steam up to 4000 metres into the skies above the summit.

“Continuing plumes of smoke are occasionally accompanied by explosive eruptions and the sound of weak blasts that can be heard up to 12 kilometres from the peak,” the Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) said in a statement.

“Rays of fire are increasingly visible from night to the following day. This indicates the potential for a larger eruption is imminent,” it said.

Jetstar, Virgin and Qantas advised passengers between 10am and 11am on Monday that all flights were cancelled.

The decision was made on safety grounds and overturns earlier expectations that flights would go ahead.

“While these disruptions are frustrating, we will always put safety before schedule,” Jetstar said in a statement.

Crowds of passengers cram customer service desks set up at Denpasar airport’s international terminal on Monday. Photo: Amilia Rosa

Virgin updated its announcement online saying Denpasar Airport had closed and the airline had subsequently cancelled all flights to Bali.

Eruptions and ash falls are likely to continue for at least the next 24 hours, the n Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) said on Monday.

And it has –enough to keep the airport closed again on Tuesday and through to 7am on Wednesday.

The BoM’s Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), which is based in Darwin, said the height of the eruption has been steadily increasing and that it is continuing to advise the aviation industry about the potential impact of volcanic ash.

“The height of the eruption has been steadily increasing, ash is currently observed to a height of 30,000 feet (or 9144 metres) and a small amount of ash has fallen at Denpasar Airport and acrossBali’s south east,” it said in a statement.

Airport spokesman Arie Ahsan said the airport closure was based on information fromVAACand the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatologyand Geophysics.

We’re continuing to closely monitor Mount Agung in Bali. Due to increased volcanic ash and current weather conditions, Denpasar Airport is now closed and we have cancelled today’s flights. More info here: https://t成都夜生活/LD8rC5LZdZ

— Virgin (@Virgin) November 26, 2017Waspadai banjir lahar hujan (lahar dingin) di sekitar Gunung Agung. Banjir lahar hujan sudah terjadi di beberapa tempat di lereng Gunung Agung. Hujan akan meningkat. Jangan melakukan aktivitas di sekitar sungai. Radius 8-10 km harus kosong dari aktivitas masyarakat. #Balipic.twitter老域名出售/5vuZ4KTTYa

— Sutopo Purwo Nugroho (@Sutopo_BNPB) November 27, 2017

Volcanic ash poses a potentially deadly threat to aircraft and passengers.

Mount Agung is just over 72 kilometres from Kuta, and towers over eastern Bali at a height of just over 3000 metres.

It last erupted in 1963, killing more than 1000 people and razing several villages.

with AAP