Advertisers spending big to get hands on your data

Advertisers ramped up their spend on audience data in 2017, with telcos among the industries keen to work out what their consumers want before they even know it themselves.
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In , internet and telecommunications companies’ spend on this type of data grew the most in the past year, the annual Eyeota Index Report shows.

Internet and telecoms included mobile service providers, cable and internet service providers and IT and web services. Second for growth in spend was the pharma and healthcare industry, followed by education, hotels, and resorts and casinos.

The report, which uses internal data spanning 2400 brands in more than 60 countries, found the type of audience data bought was predominantly ‘sociodemographic’.

That is, brands were interested in knowing details about their potential customers like financial status, education level, age, gender, home ownership, house value, ethnic group and career status.

It also included specific ‘sociodemographic profiles’ such as asking for data to focus on pre-defined groups. Some of the most targeted included affluent professionals, families and urban city-dwellers.

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Some of the increase in spend has been due to a push towards personalisation of campaigns.

Eyeota APAC managing director Andrew Tu said patterns of audience data usage and seasonal consumer trends were emerging, allowing brands to anticipate consumer needs rather than react to demand.

This rich data would also help inform ‘programmatic advertising’ – where technology is used to automate the media buying and placement process, he said.

“We are seeing that programmatic is more than the automation of the media buying process, but rather it allows brands to react and adapt to fluctuating consumer needs in real time and audience data is at the heart of this relationship,” Mr Tu said.

This data is collected through a range of methods, including cookies and information from sites where users are logged in, Eyeota ANZ general manager Peter Hunter said.

“They want to be more targeted. If 50 per cent of advertising isn’t effective, how do we make all of it effective?” he said.

He anticipated advertisers would increasingly narrow their focus onto marketing to a specific group of consumers.

The top advertising sectors utilising audience data remained finance and automotive, electronics, and computers, where demand for the information was at consistent levels.

While 33 per cent of the audience data purchases were sociodemographic in nature, B2B data was also popular at 28 per cent of the information demanded, including details such as employment area, technology, company size and company revenue.

Interest took up a further 18 per cent of the data, including topics such as tech, food, social media, gambling, education, internet activities, business and entertainment.

Globally, electronic and computer brands doubled their audience spend – predominantly in the B2B category.

Advertisers ramped up their spend on audience data in 2017, with telcos among the industries keen to work out what their consumers want before they even know it themselves.
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In , internet and telecommunications companies’ spend on this type of data grew the most in the past year, the annual Eyeota Index Report shows.

Internet and telecoms included mobile service providers, cable and internet service providers and IT and web services. Second for growth in spend was the pharma and healthcare industry, followed by education, hotels, and resorts and casinos.

The report, which uses internal data spanning 2400 brands in more than 60 countries, found the type of audience data bought was predominantly ‘sociodemographic’.

That is, brands were interested in knowing details about their potential customers like financial status, education level, age, gender, home ownership, house value, ethnic group and career status.

It also included specific ‘sociodemographic profiles’ such as asking for data to focus on pre-defined groups. Some of the most targeted included affluent professionals, families and urban city-dwellers.

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Some of the increase in spend has been due to a push towards personalisation of campaigns.

Eyeota APAC managing director Andrew Tu said patterns of audience data usage and seasonal consumer trends were emerging, allowing brands to anticipate consumer needs rather than react to demand.

This rich data would also help inform ‘programmatic advertising’ – where technology is used to automate the media buying and placement process, he said.

“We are seeing that programmatic is more than the automation of the media buying process, but rather it allows brands to react and adapt to fluctuating consumer needs in real time and audience data is at the heart of this relationship,” Mr Tu said.

This data is collected through a range of methods, including cookies and information from sites where users are logged in, Eyeota ANZ general manager Peter Hunter said.

“They want to be more targeted. If 50 per cent of advertising isn’t effective, how do we make all of it effective?” he said.

He anticipated advertisers would increasingly narrow their focus onto marketing to a specific group of consumers.

The top advertising sectors utilising audience data remained finance and automotive, electronics, and computers, where demand for the information was at consistent levels.

While 33 per cent of the audience data purchases were sociodemographic in nature, B2B data was also popular at 28 per cent of the information demanded, including details such as employment area, technology, company size and company revenue.

Interest took up a further 18 per cent of the data, including topics such as tech, food, social media, gambling, education, internet activities, business and entertainment.

Globally, electronic and computer brands doubled their audience spend – predominantly in the B2B category.